Criticism.

Standard

I packed a whole weekend’s worth of stuff into one day (yesterday), neglecting some less frivolous things. I might regret that later. I already regret getting involved in singing Bonnie Tyler yesterday morning because I woke up with the earworm back and firmly implanted, possibly forever.

In the absence of cleverness and time, and to spare you an extended whine about the crazy busy festival we’re dealing with at work for the next two days (but I don’t wannaaaaaa be at work for 13 hours), here’s a disclaimer about all things I say about movies, something that should be obvious:

If you have an inkling that we don’t share taste in movies, approach everything I write about them with a salt lick. Not that I’m especially snobby about films (no, really, I’m not…well, okay, sometimes I am), or way outside of the mainstream, but my tastes don’t line up with everyone’s. Neither do yours. It’s why, when I’m researching films for the cinema, we have to look at a cross-section of reviews to see whether something will work for our audience, or whether it’s just something that the critics love and our customers will request based on reviews they’ve read too.

This pithy warning comes because I raved about The Descendants, at work even, and two other simians went to see it this week and didn’t care for it, couldn’t connect to it. That happens. It happens a lot. And for some reason, I felt culpability for their meh experiences with it because I really talked it up a lot. But it’s not my fault. It’s extremely rare for something to say a movie is really great and for me to agree once I’ve seen it too. (Exceptions this year include The Artist – but at least two employees AT OUR CINEMA weren’t that jazzed about it either. Another thought it was an overly chipper waste of time and didn’t bother to watch. No, these are not bad people, unless I’ve been misled by months/years of knowing them; it just wasn’t their thing.)

A person I know through Twitter recommended not making movie suggestions to specific people without asking them what their favourite movies are. (Or, rather, by asking which five DVDs they would rescue if their home was on fire – assuming, I guess, that family and pets were accounted for? I hope?) It’s a wise move. I don’t take this into consideration very often, except with friends I know who don’t like violence or very dark subject matter (‘The Skin I Lived In was pretty good, but yeah, you probably wouldn’t dig it’).

So, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. I really enjoyed it. You might too, if you miss the Cold War, mostly because it made for good stories, and like movies where you have to pay close attention to men in suits sitting around smoking, drinking, and talking. Disclaimed!

(The five blu-rays/DVDs I’d rescue in a fire (that aren’t TV series)? Murder by Death, The Apartment, Chungking Express, This Is Spinal Tap, and Fargo. This answer would probably be different on any given day, though.)


Edited to add that Richard says this blog looks weird on his computer at work and at home (everything in the body text  is bold, except the italicised bits), but it looks fine on this end. Anyone else having a problem? I’m mega-confused.

Edited again to say that I changed the font in the CSS, which seems to have resolved the issue, but doesn’t explain why only he had problems (on two different computers). Hm.

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